If your share value falls, so could your tax bill 2

fictitious newspapers

Did you know that in the case of Mr Brown v HMRC Mr Brown was able to claim a tax deduction for the loss in his share value without having to sell his shares? Its true, its known as a NegligibleValue Claim and HMRC have Help Sheet on it (286).

A negligible value claim enables you to set a capital loss against your income (or against other capital gains if you have them) for earlier years and claim a tax refund.

Many negligible value claims are made by shareholder directors whose company has failed. Their claim is to offset the loss on the shares in their company against their directors’ wages for earlier tax years.

When a taxpayer owns shares which become of negligible value the taxpayer may make a claim under s24 TCGA 1992, resulting in a deemed disposal and reacquisition, which crystallises a capital loss.

steve@bicknells.net

The effect of a negligible value claim is broadly that the taxpayer is treated as if he or she had disposed of the asset and immediately reacquired it for the amount specified in the claim.
Read more at http://www.taxationweb.co.uk/tax-articles/general/negligible-value-claims.html#Hlmd7ytCESlJuT27.99
The effect of a negligible value claim is broadly that the taxpayer is treated as if he or she had disposed of the asset and immediately reacquired it for the amount specified in the claim.
Read more at http://www.taxationweb.co.uk/tax-articles/general/negligible-value-claims.html#Hlmd7ytCESlJuT27.99

Do you think National Insurance should be merged with Income Tax? it could happen soon 9

Pay Packet And Banknotes

The Tax Payer’s Alliance have been  campaigning and it looks like the Chancellor, George Osborne, has agreed that the first step is to re-name National Insurance as “Earnings Tax”. The change is to be proposed in legislation this week.

This story was reported in the Telegraph on 23rd February. There is also an interesting article on Tax Research UK (Richard Murphy).

You pay National Insurance contributions to build up your entitlement to certain state benefits, including the State Pension.

You pay National Insurance if you’re:

  • 16 or over
  • an employee earning above £149 a week
  • self employed and making a profit over £7,755 a year (Class 4) plus £2.70 per week Class 2 NI (you may not have to pay any Class 2 NI if your profits are below £5,725)

If you’re employed, you stop paying Class 1 National Insurance when you reach the State Pension age.

If you’re self-employed you stop paying:

  • Class 2 National Insurance when you reach State Pension age (or up to 4 months after this to pay off any contributions you owe)
  • Class 4 National Insurance from the start of the tax year after the one in which you reach State Pension age

Income Tax is whole different ball game. Whilst I can see its simpler to have one tax the changes that would be required to achieve it would be huge!

Is it worthwhile?

steve@bicknells.net

 

 

 

Maximising Gift Aid Donations 2

Give and Receive Sharing Support Helping Others

The end of the tax year is just a few weeks away.

Gift Aid donations are regarded as having basic rate tax deducted by the donor. Charities or CASCs take your donation – which is money you’ve already paid tax on – and reclaim the basic rate tax from HM Revenue & Customs (HMRC) on its ‘gross’ equivalent – the amount before basic rate tax was deducted.

Basic rate tax is 20 per cent, so this means that if you give £10 using Gift Aid, it’s worth £12.50 to the charity.

A Gift Aid declaration must include:

  • your full name
  • your home address
  • the name of the charity
  • details of your donation, and it should say that it’s a Gift Aid donation

If you pay higher rate tax, you can claim the difference between the higher rate of tax 40 and/or 45 per cent and the basic rate of tax 20 per cent on the total ‘gross’ value of your donation to the charity or CASC.

For example, if you donate £100, the total value of your donation to the charity is £125 – so you can claim back:

  • £25 – if you pay tax at 40 per cent (£125 × 20%)
  • £31.25 – if you pay tax at 45 per cent (£125 × 20%) plus (£125 × 5%)

You can make this claim on your Self Assessment tax return

If you are a higher rate tax payer donations made in 2013/14 will save tax at 45 percent, but in 2012/13 the rate was 50 per cent.

You can ask for Gift Aid donations to be treated as being paid in the previous tax year if you paid enough tax that year to cover both any Gift Aid gifts you made that year and the ones you want to backdate.

So if you want to donate now (before the end of the tax year) you could claim back extra tax by carrying it back into the previous tax year.

 

steve@bicknells.net

 

First there was Fair Trade, now there is Fair Tax…… 2

The Fair Trade Mark is now common place on goods we buy ensuring that workers aren’t exploited, but now there is a new mark, the Fair Tax Mark.

The Fair Tax Mark Criteria assess the quality of a business’ publicly available information on key tax and transparency issues. In this context, publicly available information primarily means a full set of accounts available to all via Companies House or the company website. However, it can also include the company website and/or any other freely available printed material.

For every business type, the criteria are divided into two main categories that assess a business on:

  • Transparency

  • Tax rate, disclosure and avoidance

http://www.fairtaxmark.net/

Will your business be applying to use the Fair Tax Mark? would you buy more from a business that uses the Mark?

steve@bicknells.net

Have you claimed capital allowances on your building? time is running out… 3

act now icon

FA2008 introduced a new classification of integral features of a building or structure, expenditure on the provision or replacement of which qualifies for WDAs at the 10% special rate. The new classification applies to qualifying expenditure incurred on or after 1 April 2008 (CT) or 6 April 2008 (IT).

http://www.hmrc.gov.uk/manuals/camanual/CA22300.htm

The rules on integral features apply where a person carrying on a qualifying activity incurs expenditure on the provision or replacement of an integral feature for the purposes of that qualifying activity. Each of the following is an integral feature of a building or structure –

  1. an electrical system (including a lighting system),
  2. a cold water system,
  3. a space or water heating system, a powered system of ventilation, air cooling or air purification, and any floor or ceiling comprised in such a system,
  4. a lift, an escalator or a moving walkway,
  5. external solar shading

Only assets that are on the list are integral features for PMA purposes; if an asset is not one of those included in the list, the integral features rules are not in point.

However, Plant and Machinery includes….

other building fixtures, such as shop fittings, kitchen and bathroom fittings

Many businesses have never claimed capital allowances for these items.

Paragraph 13 of Schedule 10 FA2012 introduced transitional provisions for making claims.

The provisions mean that where the current owner incurs expenditure on acquiring fixtures from a past owner before 1 (or 6) April 2014 and the past owner has not claimed allowances or pooled their expenditure in respect of a qualifying fixture,  the current owner may claim PMA on the part of the price the paid which is attributable to that fixture….. CA26470

It is possible for the buyer to use apportionment of the sale price (usually done by an RICS Surveyor) to determine the value of the fixtures. But this risks clawback of balancing charges for the seller.

A alternative option is to claim a Section 198 election which can be entered into within 2 years of the date of the property sale. It must be signed by the buyer and the seller and must identify the items covered. The elected value can be between £1 and the price paid, but makesure you undertand the implications of the price choosen.

As a Section 198 requires agreement you may wish to take legal advice Bonallack & Bishop Solicitors can help Jane.Bishop@Bishopslaw.com.

The Section 198 needs to made in writing to HMRC.

The following can’t claim a Section 198:

  • Property Traders
  • Developers
  • Pension Funds
  • Charities

But if you can claim you need to claim now as there are only a few weeks left until April 2014.

steve@bicknells.net

Doctor help my Travel Expense has been disallowed Reply

The raised traumatism on road

On the 16th December 2013 Dr Samad Samadian v HMRC had his appeal on Travel heard by The honourable Mr Justice Sales and it was decided to uphold the previous decision of the First Tier Tribunal.

After an enquiry lasting more than seven years and three tribunal hearings, the First-tier Tribunal led by Judge Kevin Poole acknowledged Dr Samad Samadian had a dedicated office in his home which was necessary for his professional activity.

However, the panel did not accept that the home office could be treated as the starting point for calculating private practice business mileage involving habitual journeys.

So in summary:

  • Home to Hospitals – Disallowed
  • Hospital to Hospital – Disallowed as Business Expenses (but could be allowed against Employment)
  • Visits to Patients – Allowed

Now would be a good time to check your tavel mileage claims to makesure they are valid.

steve@bicknells.net

 

 

Will HMRC help you get over the Floods? Reply

Flood defences

Will it ever stop raining!

But help is at hand, HMRC launched their helpline today (12/2/14)

The helpline will enable anyone affected to get fast, practical help and advice on a wide range of tax problems they may be facing.

HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) will also:

  • agree instalment arrangements where taxpayers are unable to pay as a result of the floods;
  • agree a practical approach when individuals and businesses have lost vital records to the floods;
  • suspend debt collection proceedings for those affected by the floods;
  • cancel penalties when the taxpayer has missed statutory deadlines.

The helpline is in addition to other HMRC telephone contact numbers.

The helpline is 0800 904 7900. Opening hours are Monday to Friday, 8.00 am to 8.00 pm; Saturday and Sunday, 8.00 am to 4.00 pm, excluding bank holidays.

I hope the weather improves soon and your business can keep going and survive the storms.

steve@bicknells.net

 

Karren likes the Employment Allowance – £2000 will be very NIC(E) Reply

money.gif

This is what Karren Brady said…..

She has a point, £2,000 will be a big help to many SME’s.

The Employment Allowance is available from 6 April 2014. If you are eligible you can reduce your employer Class 1 NICs by up to £2,000 each tax year.

You can claim the Employment Allowance if you are a business or charity (including Community Amateur Sports Clubs) that pays employer Class 1 NICs on your employees’ or directors’ earnings.

If your company belongs to a group of companies or your charity is part of a charities structure, only one company or charity can claim the allowance. It is up to you to decide which company or charity will claim the allowance.

You can only claim the £2,000 Employment Allowance against one PAYE scheme – even if your business runs multiple schemes.

You cannot claim the Employment Allowance, for example if you:

  • employ someone for personal, household or domestic work, such as a nanny, au pair, chauffeur, gardener, care support worker
  • already claim the allowance through a connected company or charity
  • are a public authority, this includes; local, district, town and parish councils
  • carry out functions either wholly or mainly of a public nature (unless you have charitable status), for example:
    • NHS services
    • General Practitioner services
    • the managing of housing stock owned by or for a local council
    • providing a meals on wheels service for a local council
    • refuse collection for a local council
    • prison services
    • collecting debt for a government department

You do not carry out a function of a public nature, if you are:

  • providing security and cleaning services for a public building, such as government or local council offices
  • supplying IT services for a government department or local council

Personal and Managed Service Companies who pay contract fees instead of a wage or salary, may not be able to claim the Employment Allowance, as you cannot claim the allowance for any deemed payments of employment income.

Service companies can only claim the allowance, if you pay earnings and have an employer Class 1 NICs liability on these earnings.

You can use your own payroll software (see your software provider’s instructions), or HM Revenue and Customs’ (HMRC’s) Basic PAYE Tools to claim the Employment Allowance.

When you make your claim (using the software of your choice), you must reduce your employer Class 1 NICs payment by an amount of Employment Allowance equal to your employer Class 1 NICs due, but not more than £2,000 per year.

You can read the full guidance here

Will the Employment Allowance be NICE for your business?

steve@bicknells.net

VAT Returns may soon be monthly… 2

3D Vat button block cube text

From January 2017 the European Commission would like to make VAT returns monthly in all member states. Currently most UK businesses file quarterly, they only file monthly if they get regular refunds.

The European Commission see this as cutting red tape, but I am not sure how going from 4 returns to 12 returns cuts red tape?

The Commission say they have received complaints from companies who do business across Europe about confusion over the frequency of returns.

The EC is hoping to introduce a single format return, with just five mandatory boxes.  This will include:

  1. input VAT;
  2. output VAT;
  3. net VAT payable;
  4. value of input transactions; and
  5. value of output transactions.

and there could be a concession for small businesses allowing them to continue to do quarterly returns.

Do you think monthly returns would be better or worse for UK Business?

steve@bicknells.net

 

HMRC’s Start-up Saturday event Reply

Revenue and Customs

Business start-ups can take part in four free live tax webinars run by HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) on 15 February

HMRC Start-up Saturday webinar programme, between 10am and 5pm, is aimed at new and prospective businesses. Each live webinar lasts an hour and gives the opportunity for questions.

The HMRC webinars are:

Self-Employment and HMRC – What You Need to Know

10am to 11am Saturday 15 February

This session concentrates on the information sole traders or partnerships need when they start. It covers registration, National Insurance, Self Assessment and record keeping.

Register for Self-Employment webinar external link

Company Directors – Your Responsibilities to HMRC

12pm to 1pm Saturday 15 February

This webinar is aimed at businesses considering setting up as limited companies. It provides the basics on incorporation and registration with Companies House and HMRC. It also looks at when companies become an employer, and the timetable for paying Corporation Tax online.

Register for Company Directors webinar   external link

Business Expenses for the Self-Employed

2pm to 4pm Saturday 15 February

Sole traders or partnerships need to know which day-to-day expenses they are able to claim for tax relief. They also need to start keeping records of these as soon as the business starts. This webinar provides an overview of the most common expenses, including motoring costs.

Register for Business Expenses webinar external link

What is VAT?

4pm to 5pm Saturday 15 February

New businesses are often worried about VAT, what it is and when they need to register. This webinar answers these questions and explains in simple terms how VAT works.

Register for ‘What is VAT’ webinar external link

re-blogged from https://business.wales.gov.uk/news-events/news/hmrc%E2%80%99s-start-saturday-event

steve@bicknells.net