Share Buy Back Multiple Completion Checklist Reply

Young woman with checklist over shoulder shot

Exit planning is critical if you want to save tax.

Typically when a shareholder wants to leave a business, the company will buy back the shares, but often the company wants to pay in stages to ease the cashflow.

The problem is that buy back in stages generally means that Entrepreneurs Tax Relief can’t be used and to make things worse the buybacks will be tax as a distribution.

The Companies Act prohibits buy back by instalment, however HMRC Tax Bulletin 21 says…

The Board can only consider a request relating to a transaction which appears to be a valid PoS. The Companies Act 1985 lays down certain procedural rules which must be followed. Also, the consideration for the shares must be paid immediately and must be paid in money. The first of these requirements means that payment by instalments is not possible. It is, however, possible to make a contract under which successive tranches of shares are to be purchased on specified dates.

So here is checklist of things to consider to create a multiple completion:

  1. Ask HMRC for advance clearance – the buy back will be treated as a single event and subject to Entrepreneurs Tax Relief on the whole amount on day one
  2. Make sure your solicitor draws up an agreement that transfers beneficial interest on day one whilst retaining a legal interest
  3. Whilst the shares still exist beneficial interest has been disposed of
  4. Voting rights can no longer be exercised
  5. The creditor for deferred completion must not be loan capital

Clearly you will need professional advice from your solicitor and accountant to create a multiple completion contract.

steve@bicknells.net

Would an online IR35 test help? 2

Tablet

The Term “IR35” became established following a Budget press release issued by the Inland Revenue on 23rd September 1999. That press release was called “IR35”. At its simplest, IR35 is the way in which the taxman closed a loophole that was allowing many contractors and freelance professionals to avoid paying large amounts of Tax and National Insurance.

In 2012 HMRC put forward the Business Tests but they haven’t been as successful as first thought.

Here are the 12 tests, scores shown in()

  1. Business premises (10)
  2. PII (2)
  3. Efficiency (10)
  4. Assistance (35)
  5. Advertising (2)
  6. Previous PAYE (minus 15)
  7. Business plan (1)
  8. Repair at own expense (4)
  9. Client risk (10)
  10. Billing (2)
  11. Right of substitution (2)
  12. Actual substitution (20)

A score less than 10 is high risk and a score more than 20 is low risk. Fail the test and it could cost you a great deal in tax.

In general the key test tend to be:

  1. Substitution
  2. Control
  3. Financial Risk

HMRC launched the ESI (Employment Status Indicator) a while ago.

The recently published Minutes of the IR35 Forum’s last meeting held on 24th July reveal that HMRC are keen for contractors to be able to assess their employment status by way of the Employment Status Indicator (ESI) tool.

Will this resolve the IR35 Status problems?

 

steve@bicknells.net

Pool Cars – Do you have a ‘no private use’ Policy? Reply

Pool Cars

The latest case Vinyl Design Ltd v HMRC [2014] TC 03345 highlights why policies and mileage records are important.

Here are the facts of the case:

  • The company’s only 2 employees were the directors
  • They had different cars for private use
  • They argued the Pool car was only for Business Use
  • They had no policy
  • They had no Mileage Records
  • Pool Cars kept at home due to risk of vandelism

Not surprisingly HMRC won the case !!

So what should you do to prove there is no private use:

  1. Keep the car on the company’s business premises
  2. Keep the keys at the company’s business premises
  3. Prepare a Board Minute
  4. Make sure your contract of employment bans private use
  5. Keep a mileage log
  6. Insure the car principally for business use

HMRC have specific rules on keeping vehicles at home in EIM23465

Even if you do meet the 60% rule you still have to prove ‘no private use’

steve@bicknells.net

Will your Share Buy Back pass the ‘trade benefit’ test? Reply

Successful Businessman With A Contract In Hand

Often as part of an exit strategy or succession planning companies will buy back shares.

Setting aside the mechanics, nicely explained in the ACCA Technical Factsheet 177 and the need for S1044 CTA 2010 clearance, the Buy Back has to be in the benefit of the trade not just the shareholder.

For example….

If the purpose is to ensure that an unwilling shareholder who wishes to end his association with the company does not sell his shares to someone who might not be acceptable to the other shareholders, the purchase will normally be regarded as benefiting the company’s trade.

Examples of unwilling shareholders are:

  • an outside shareholder who has provided equity finance (whether or not with the expectation of redemption or sale to the company) and who now wishes to withdraw that finance
  • a controlling shareholder who is retiring as a director and wishes to make way for new management
  • personal representatives of a deceased shareholder, where they wish to realise the value of the shares
  • a legatee of a deceased shareholder, where he does not wish to hold shares in the company

Assuming that the shares aren’t being bought back at Par Value, basic rate taxpayers will probably prefer dividends for any surplus where as higher rate taxpayer will want capital treatment.

Share Buy Back is complex, make sure you seek professional advice.

 

steve@bicknells.net

 

 

42 Business Valuation “Rules of Thumb” – are they right? 2

Looking at phone

 

I often get asked for ‘Rules of Thumb’ for small businesses, so I have searched the internet and compiled this list, do you agree with the ‘Rules’?

Rule of Thumb

Rules of Thumb are just a starting point and many other factors need to be considered in valuing a business, it also worth considering HMRC’s views (not so good for Chefs and Hairdressers)..

Any goodwill attributable to the personal skills of the proprietor, for example the personal skills of a chef or a hairdresser, will not be transferred to the new proprietor. Advice should be obtained from the CG Technical Group if it is claimed that the goodwill attributable to the personal skills of the proprietor have been transferred with the business because his/her services have been retained for the foreseeable future by means of an employment contract. All of the relevant facts and circumstances should be established before referral to the CG Technical Group.

http://www.hmrc.gov.uk/manuals/cgmanual/cg68010.htm

steve@bicknells.net

 

Have you got undeclared Credit Card sales? Reply

Kartenlesegerät, geld überweisen,  Kreditkarte, Hand

The Credit Card Sales Campaign is an opportunity to bring your tax affairs up to date if you’re an individual or business that accepts credit or debit card payments.

Who can do this

This opportunity is for you if:

  1. you accept card payments for goods or service
  2. you haven’t declared all your UK tax liabilities

Get the best terms

You need to tell HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) if you either:

  • haven’t registered with them
  • have failed to declare all your income

This is called a ‘voluntary disclosure’.

What happens if you should disclose but don’t

HMRC has details of all credit and debit card payments to UK businesses. This information is used to identify individuals and businesses that might not have paid what they owe.

Credit Card Sales Campaign Helpline
Telephone: 0300 123 9272
From outside the UK: +44 300 123 9272
Monday to Friday, 9am to 5pm

steve@bicknells.net

The tax incentive to lend to Social Enterprises? Reply

money.gif

Social Investment Tax Relief (SITR) came in on 6th April 2014.

Individuals making an eligible investment at any time from 6 April 2014 can deduct 30% of the cost of their investment from their income tax liability for 2014/15 (or the relevant later year in which the investment is made). The minimum period of investment is 3 years.

The income tax and capital gain tax reliefs provide a substantial incentive for investors. To make sure new investment is directed to the organisations which need it most and to meet EU regulations, the investment and the organisation receiving it must meet certain criteria.

Organisations must have a defined and regulated social purpose. Charities, community interest companies or community benefit societies carrying out a qualifying trade, with fewer than 500 employees and gross assets of no more than £15 million may be eligible.

The tax relief is available on unsecured loans as well as shares.

So basically, if you are a basic rate tax payer using SITR will be better than Gift Aid.

Not only do you get the tax relief but if you give a loan it will be repaid (after 3 years).

steve@bicknells.net

Have you got a Will? 1

Signing Last Will and Testament

Currently 47% of UK adults die intestate, in other words without a will.

The new Inheritance and Trustees’ Powers Act 2014 (ITPA 2014), came into force on 1 October 2014.
Here are some of the New Rules:
  1. Where there are no children, the entire estate will pass to the surviving partner (this shuts out blood relatives such as parents, brothers, sisters or their children)
  2. Where someone dies leaving a spouse and direct descendants the first £250k will pass to the surviving spouse/partner plus 50 per cent of the remaining balance as a capital sum (previously they had a life interest in 50 per cent of the remaining balance)
  3. Unmarried couples continue to recieve nothing if their spouse dies intestate

If you are tempted to try a ‘do it yourself’ Will, think again, they might be cheap but the consequences of getting it wrong could be extremely costly for your family.

If you own a business you also need to consider carefully what your succession plan will be.

My advice is to see a solicitor carryout estate planning and prepare a will.

 

steve@bicknells.net

 

Have you had your annual tax statement? Reply

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Back in 2010 the Government promised every taxpayer an annual statement of their tax position – not just the income tax and National Insurance paid, but also where the money was spent.

During October these statement will start to be sent out, see the example above.

If you’re registered for online self-assessment you’ll be able to access your statement digitally by logging on to the HMRC website in the usual format, selecting the tax summary option.

Initially the statements will only cover your tax position for 2012/2013 and at first only selected taxpayers will receive one.

Is this a positive step forward or a waste of time?

 

steve@bicknells.net

Are you one of the third of workers with a part time business? Reply

Business people group.

Almost a third of British workers run some kind of creative business outside their main job contributing an estimated £15bn to the UK economy, according to new research from Moo.com. Profitability among this group of enterprises has increased by 32% in the past year. One in ten part-time creative entrepreneurs plans to leave their job to focus on their business full-time within the next year. However, 60% said it was their passion for the business, and not making money, that motivated them. The most popular part-time creative ventures are in food and cooking, gardening, photography and knitting. (According to Law Donut)

So why are micro businesses taking off:

  1. You can start off working at home
  2. Your start up costs are low
  3. You can do it part time when it suits you
  4. With wages frozen and costs rising it can provide a useful additional income
  5. Its easy to be price competitive with low overheads
  6. The Internet makes it easy to sell your goods and services
  7. Your social capital can be used to generate sales ie use your contacts and connections
  8. There could tax advantages – employees generally pay more tax than sole traders
  9. Some clients prefer the personal touch
  10. It could be start of something big

Here are my top 20 home based business ideas:

  1. Get a lodger – Under rent-a-room a taxpayer can be exempt from Income Tax on profits from furnished accommodation in their only or main home if the gross receipts they get (that is, before expenses) are £4,250 or less
  2. Ironing and Laundry Services – Always popular and you can start with friends and family
  3. E Bay Trading – as E Bay say… The first task is to sort through those bulging drawers and messy cupboards, finding stuff to flog. Get a big eBay box to stash your wares in, and systematically clear out wardrobes, DVD and CD piles, the loft and garage. Use the easy 12-month rule of thumb to help you decide what to offload: Haven’t used it for a year? Flog it.
  4. Blogging – Blogging has taken off and many businesses are looking for people to write blogs for them
  5. Candle Making – You can sell the candles on line and its easy to buy the wax and things you need to make the candles
  6. Car Boot Sale – As with E Bay but without going on line
  7. Cake Making – Make sure everything is labelled correctly and you comply with Health & Safety issues
  8. Data Entry – The internet makes it easy to enter data from where ever you are
  9. Social Media – Similar to blogging, businesses need help to manage Twitter, Facebook and Linked In
  10. Website Design – If you have the expertise, go for it
  11. Sales Parties –  Cosmetics to Ann Summers, there is a long list of opportunities
  12. Sewing and Clothes Alterations – Perfect before and after Christmas
  13. Jewellery – Making and selling jewellery is always popular and great for Christmas presents
  14. Car Repairs – Assuming you have the skills needed and comply with legal requirements
  15. Pet Care – Walking dogs or grooming is popular
  16. Virtual Assistant – Also personal organiser or personal shopper
  17. Wedding Planner – You could start by creating a blog about your expertise
  18. Direct Sales – For example http://www.netmums.com/back-to-work/working-for-yourself/direct-selling-opportunities
  19. Computer Repair – Great provided you have the skills
  20. Marketing – Telesales to leaflet design and freelance writing

 

steve@bicknells.net