Do you have overseas assets and income you haven’t declared? Reply

All accountants and tax agents should now be sending or have sent a letter or e mail to their clients saying

From 2016, HM Revenue & Customs (HMRC) is getting an unprecedented amount of information about people’s overseas accounts, structures, trusts, and investments from more than 100 jurisdictions worldwide, thanks to agreements to increase global tax transparency. This gives HMRC unprecedented levels of information to check that, as in most cases, the right tax has been paid.

If you have already declared all of your past and present income or gains to HMRC, including from overseas, you do not need to worry. But if you are in any doubt, HMRC recommends that you read the factsheet attached to help you decide now what to do next.

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/client-notification-income-or-assets-abroad/notes-on-how-and-when-to-send-the-client-notification-letter

Here is a link to the fact sheet

https://bbaltd.sharepoint.com/_layouts/15/guestaccess.aspx?docid=0b2969c05c0b74833bb2c42df251ddfb0&authkey=AQoJsi8KFnP87sNNjN-JK4E

Time is running out, so make sure you declare all your income and assets.

steve@bicknells.net

Should my Assets be Revalued – How are assets revalued? (IAS16) Reply

Most assets decrease in value over time with usage and should be depreciated over their useful economic life. However, some assets increase in value for example Land & Buildings and some Metal based assets.

Under the revaluation model, revaluations should be carried out regularly, so that the carrying amount of an asset does not differ materially from its fair value at the balance sheet date. [IAS 16.31]

If an item is revalued, the entire class of assets to which that asset belongs should be revalued. [IAS 16.36]

Revalued assets are depreciated in the same way as under the cost model.

If property, plant, and equipment is stated at revalued amounts, certain additional disclosures are required: [IAS 16.77]

  • the effective date of the revaluation
  • whether an independent valuer was involved
  • the methods and significant assumptions used in estimating fair values
  • the extent to which fair values were determined directly by reference to observable prices in an active market or recent market transactions on arm’s length terms or were estimated using other valuation techniques

Revaluing Assets will not create a tax charge because:

1. If the asset value increases, the revaluation creates a balance sheet revaluation reserve – Debit Assets, Credit the Revaluation Reserve – in does not create a profit, it increases the Net Worth of the business

2. Revaluing an Asset does not affect Capital Allowances these are based on the Cost of the Asset

3. Revaluing an Asset will not generate a Deferred Tax Charge because although it will affect depreciation, it should be excluded from the Deferred Tax computation as it is excluded from Capital Allowances (IAS 12) – Revaluing the asset increases its carrying value without altering its tax base (since revaluations have no immediate tax consequences)

4. Revaluing an Asset does not create a Capital Gain, Capital Gains will only crystalise if the asset is sold

steve@bicknells.net