Making Tax Digital – HMRC Case Studies 1

HMRC have 4 fictional case studies, they are on the are on the Overview of Making Tax Digital page of the HMRC website and this was last updated on 13th July 2017

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/485372/Making_tax_digital_-_case_studies.pdf

  • Geeta – the teacher who also does some tuition
  • Richard – the landscape gardener who has just become VAT registered
  • Helen – retired
  • Dave and his Wife – who are directors of a small plumbing company

Basically

Geeta uses a App on her smartphone for record keeping

Richard was using an agent but then moves to a digital tax account

Helen uses a Personal Tax Account

Dave uses an App to provide information to his accountant

So Apps are very popular!

HMRC seem to assume that most people want to do their own record keeping and that small businesses like Geeta and Richard will no longer use accountants or book keepers.

We have an extremely complicated tax system, so how realistic is that, even HMRC struggle to calculate your tax correctly!

The way that allowances are applied for dividends, allowances, savings and other items all impact on each other.

Many tax payers will be working on their 2016/17 returns (to 5th April 2017 due by 31st January 2018) over the coming months and find that they can’t use the HMRC software because it doesn’t work properly.

As reported by Accounting Web

Rob Ellis, CEO of BTCSoftware, can’t remember a year when there have been so many exclusions from filing SA tax returns online. For the 2016/17 tax returns 16 new examples have been added to the online filing exclusions list, which is now in version 4;  there is a version 5 of this list under construction.

You can read the full list of exclusion on this link https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/622426/2017-exc-indi.pdf

There were 62 exclusions! HMRC have fixed some but aren’t intending to fix them all

 

steve@bicknells.net

The Second Finance Bill 2017 changes the timetable for Making Tax Digital – what are we doing now? Reply

The previous timetable for Making Tax Digital was

  • April 2018 – quarterly reporting for income tax purposes for unincorporated businesses with a turnover over £85,000
  • April 2019 – quarterly reporting for both incorporated and unincorporated businesses for income tax and VAT
  • April 2020 – quarterly reporting for corporation tax purposes

The new timetable will be

  • Only VAT registered businesses will need to keep digital records and only for VAT purposes.
  • They will only need to do so from April 2019.
  • Businesses will not be asked to keep digital records or update HMRC quarterly for other taxes until at least April 2020 (the original dates had implementation from April 2019).

If you are VAT registered then you will need to move to digital record keeping (i.e. use software to record all your VAT invoices and receipts).

This is massive change in timetable and one that many small businesses and landlords will welcome.

Whilst this now gives smaller businesses longer to prepare, MTDfB is still coming in 2020 and expected to require unincorporated businesses to report the information noted below, so its still worth starting preparations and using cloud based accounting systems.

The details below are an extract from gov.uk for Quarterly Reporting

Non-property businesses

Income:

  • turnover, takings, fees, sales or money earned
  • any other business income

Expenses:

  • cost of goods bought for resale or goods used
  • construction industry – payments to subcontractors
  • wages, salaries and other staff costs
  • car, van and travel expenses
  • rent, rates, power and insurance costs
  • repairs and renewals of property and equipment
  • phone, fax, stationary and other office costs
  • advertising and business entertaining costs
  • interest on bank and other charges
  • bank, credit card and other financial charges
  • irrecoverable debts written off
  • accountancy, legal and other professional fees
  • depreciation and loss/profit on sale of assets
  • other business expenses
  • goods and services for your own use
  • income, receipts and other profits included in business income or expenses but not taxable as business profits
  • disallowable element for each category

Property businesses

Income – furnished holiday lettings:

  • rental income and any income for services provided to tenants

Expenses – furnished holiday lettings:

  • tax taken off income
  • rent paid, repairs, insurance and cost of services provided
  • loan interest and other financial costs
  • legal, management and other professional fees
  • other allowable property expenses
  • private use adjustment
  • premiums for the grant of a lease
  • reverse premiums and inducements
  • property repairs and maintenance
  • costs of services provided, including wages

Income – property:

  • rental income and other income from property

Expenses – property:

  • tax taken off any income from total rents
  • premiums for the grant of a lease
  • reverse premiums and inducements
  • rent, rates, insurance, ground rents etc.
  • property repairs and maintenance
  • loan interest for residential properties and other related financial costs
  • other loan interest and financial costs
  • legal, management and other professional fees
  • costs of services provided, including wages
  • other allowable property expenses
  • private use adjustment

To find out all the latest information why not come to one of my seminars

steve@bicknells.net

What information will you need to report under Making Tax Digital (MTDfB)? Reply

Once the election is over, Making Tax Digital will be pushed forward again, ready for its launch in April 2018.

If you aren’t using any software or apps to prepare your accounts, now is the time to start. Under MTDfB – Making Tax Digital for Business – Sole Trader, Partnerships, Landlords and ultimately Companies will need to file returns every quarter and submit a final year end return.

This what you will need to report

The categories of information listed below are being reviewed and have not yet been finalised. They have been included mainly for indicative purposes.

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/bringing-business-tax-into-the-digital-age-legislation-overview/bringing-business-tax-into-the-digital-age-legislation-overview#schedule

Non-property businesses

Income:

  • turnover, takings, fees, sales or money earned
  • any other business income

Expenses:

  • cost of goods bought for resale or goods used
  • construction industry – payments to subcontractors
  • wages, salaries and other staff costs
  • car, van and travel expenses
  • rent, rates, power and insurance costs
  • repairs and renewals of property and equipment
  • phone, fax, stationary and other office costs
  • advertising and business entertaining costs
  • interest on bank and other charges
  • bank, credit card and other financial charges
  • irrecoverable debts written off
  • accountancy, legal and other professional fees
  • depreciation and loss/profit on sale of assets
  • other business expenses
  • goods and services for your own use
  • income, receipts and other profits included in business income or expenses but not taxable as business profits
  • disallowable element for each category

Property businesses

Income – furnished holiday lettings:

  • rental income and any income for services provided to tenants

Expenses – furnished holiday lettings:

  • tax taken off income
  • rent paid, repairs, insurance and cost of services provided
  • loan interest and other financial costs
  • legal, management and other professional fees
  • other allowable property expenses
  • private use adjustment
  • premiums for the grant of a lease
  • reverse premiums and inducements
  • property repairs and maintenance
  • costs of services provided, including wages

Income – property:

  • rental income and other income from property

Expenses – property:

  • tax taken off any income from total rents
  • premiums for the grant of a lease
  • reverse premiums and inducements
  • rent, rates, insurance, ground rents etc.
  • property repairs and maintenance
  • loan interest for residential properties and other related financial costs
  • other loan interest and financial costs
  • legal, management and other professional fees
  • costs of services provided, including wages
  • other allowable property expenses
  • private use adjustment

Partnerships

Interest and alternative finance receipts without UK tax deducted:

  • interest and alternative finance receipts from UK banks and building societies paid without tax deducted
  • interest distributions from UK authorised unit trusts and UK open-ended investment companies and investment trusts
  • income from National Savings and Investments
  • other untaxed income from UK savings and investments (except dividends)

Interest and alternative finance receipts with UK tax deducted:

  • other taxed income from UK savings and investments (except dividends) (amount net of tax deducted)
  • tax deducted

Dividends:

  • dividends and other qualifying distributions from UK companies
  • tax credits attached to such dividends etc
  • dividend distributions from UK authorised unit trusts and open-ended investment companies
  • tax credits attached to such distributions
  • stock dividends from UK companies
  • tax credits attached to such stock dividends
  • non-qualifying distributions and loans written off
  • tax credits attached to such distributions etc

Other income received without UK tax deducted:

  • other income – profit
  • other income – loss

Other income received with UK tax deducted:

  • other income (amount net of tax deducted)
  • tax deducted

Partnerships – end of year information

Disposal of capital assets – partnerships:

  • description of assets
  • whether listed or unlisted shares or securities (if applicable)
  • name of partners who benefited from the disposal proceeds
  • total proceeds from disposal

End of year information

Tax adjustments and elections:

  • adjustment required where the basis period is not the same as the accounting period under section 203 of the Income Tax (Trading and Other Income) Act (ITTOIA) 2005
  • averaging adjustment applied to taxable profits where an election has been made for averaging under section 222 or 222A of ITTOIA 2005
  • adjustment required as a result of a change in basis under Chapter 17 of Part 2 of ITTOIA 2005
  • total of any construction industry scheme deductions taken from payments made to subcontractors under section 61 of Finance Act 2004
  • any other tax deducted from trading income (excluding deductions made by contractors on account of tax)
  • sums due to be charged under sections 277 to 285 of ITTOIA 2005
  • adjustments required under Chapter 7 of Part 3 of ITTOIA 2005
  • claims for loss relief under Chapter 2 of Part 4 of the Income Tax Act 2007 (Chapter 4 for property businesses)
  • disallowable expenditure
  • foreign tax deducted
  • any other tax adjustment
  • adjustment on change of basis
  • foreign tax deducted

Capital allowances – claims and balancing charges:

  • annual investment allowance
  • capital allowances at 18%
  • capital allowances at 8%
  • restricted capital allowances on cars costing more than £12,000 where bought before 6 April 2009
  • business premises renovation allowance
  • enhanced capital allowances: energy-saving relief
  • enhanced capital allowances: environmentally-beneficial relief
  • enhanced capital allowanced: electric charge-points
  • enhanced capital allowances: gas refuelling equipment
  • allowances on sale or cessation of businesses use (where an asset has been disposed of for less than its tax written down value)
  • total capital allowances
  • balancing charge on sale or cessation of business use (where business renovation allowance has been claimed)
  • balancing charge on sales of other assets or on the cessation of business use (where an asset has been disposed of for less than its tax written down value)

 

steve@bicknells.net