7 situations where you might be able to claim tax credits… Reply


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You could claim Working Tax Credit if:

  • you’re aged 16 or over
  • you work a certain number of hours a week
  • you get paid for the work you do (or expect to)
  • your income is below a certain level

Here is a summary of how much you could claim:

Element Amount
You’re a couple applying together Up to £1,990 a year
You’re a single parent Up to £1,990 a year
You work at least 30 hours week Up to £800 a year
You have a disability Up to £2,935 a year
You have a severe disability Up to £1,255 a year (on top of the disability payment)
You pay for approved childcare Up to £122.50 (1 child) or £210 (2 or more children) a week

Reasons why you might be able to claim or find it difficult to claim:

  1. 5 million claims are made each year, have you checked you eligibility with the https://www.gov.uk/tax-credits-calculator
  2. Often small business owners have low incomes, particularly when the business is in the start up phase meaning they may be able to claim
  3. If you live in another EEA country but you are still liable to pay (and actually pay) UK National Insurance contributions (for instance you live in Republic of Ireland but work in Northern Ireland) you may still be able to claim
  4. If you (or your partner) go abroad for up to eight weeks at a time, HMRC will treat you as if you are still in the UK, providing you intend your visit abroad to be temporary. Temporary means you expect it to last less than 52 weeks.
  5. Couples find it complicated – Members of a couple must make a joint claim with their partner. Although this may appear a fairly straightforward and sensible requirement, it is one of the more complicated and problematic parts of the tax credits system. Ask your accountant for help.
  6. Crown Servants are exempt from the absence rules
  7. One area of particular difficulty in determining whether to make a single or joint claim is where one partner is in the UK and the other is not. The interaction with various EU law rules makes this a difficult area.

steve@bicknells.net

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