How much SDLT do you pay on Overage? Reply


What is Overage

http://www.propertylawuk.net/propertytransactionsoverage.html

When land is sold, the vendor will normally do his best to sell at the best possible price – indeed, if the vendor is a public sector authority or a charity, he may be obliged to sell at the best possible price. Sometimes, however, the best possible price may only be available at some time in the future, or not at all. The most common example of this is where planning permission may be granted for a more valuable use of the land, but it is by no means certain that the permission will be forthcoming and, in any event, this is unlikely to happen for some time. Similarly, if land is sold for a particular purpose, such as for the development of 50 houses, and the developer in fact manages to build 60, then the land will obviously be more valuable with 60 houses on it rather than the original 50.

HMRC Rules

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/stamp-duty-land-tax-the-amount-used-to-calculate-whats-payable#cc

Payment depending on the outcome of future events

A transaction could include an amount that the buyer will only pay if some future event happens. This is known as the ‘contingent consideration’.

For example, a developer might agree to pay an extra sum, on condition that they get planning permission for redevelopment.

In these cases you pay SDLT on the assumption that the contingency will happen. The buyer can apply to defer payment of SDLT on the contingent amount. But HMRC still charge the tax at the appropriate rate for the total chargeable consideration.

For example, a builder buys a plot for £400,000 and agrees to pay a further £200,000 if he gets planning permission for a new building. He can apply for deferment on SDLT on the conditional £200,000 but will pay SDLT on the initial payment now. The SDLT due on the initial payment will be at 4%, because the total potential payment is above the £500,000 threshold.

Payment depending on uncertain future events

Some transactions may include a later payment which depends on an unknown variable. This is known as the ‘uncertain or unascertained consideration’.

For example, future payments based on the turnover of a business.

In these cases, calculate the SDLT on the basis of a ‘just and reasonable estimate’ of the amount involved. The buyer can apply to defer payment of the uncertain or unascertainable part. Otherwise, make an appropriate adjustment when the amount of consideration is certain.

steve@bicknells.net

 

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