Understanding the Tax Consequences of s455 Directors Loan: A Guide for UK Business Owners


If you’re a director or shareholder of a UK company, it’s important to understand the tax consequences of s455 Directors Loan. Failure to comply with HMRC regulations can lead to penalties and additional tax liabilities. In this blog post, we will explore the tax implications of s455 Directors Loan, the rate of tax payable, when and how the tax is paid, reclaiming the tax, benefits in kind, board resolutions, bed and breakfasting loans, anti-avoidance rules, relief time period, and including relevant notes in micro accounts.

  1. Understanding s455 Directors Loan:
    S455 Directors Loan refers to money borrowed by a company director or shareholder from their company. If the loan is not repaid within 9 months following the end of the accounting period, it can incur tax implications for both the company and the director.
  2. Rate of Tax Payable:
    The rate of tax payable on s455 Directors Loan is currently set at 33.75% of the outstanding loan amount. This tax is paid by the company, not the individual director or shareholder.CTM61505 – Close companies: loans to participators and arrangements conferring benefit on participator: general – HMRC internal manual – GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)
  3. When is Tax Payable?
    The tax on s455 Directors Loan is typically due at the same time the company’s corporation tax is due – nine months and one day after the end of the accounting period in which the loan was made.
  4. How is Tax Paid?
    Tax payable on s455 Directors Loan is paid by including it as part of the company’s corporation tax liability, which is reported and paid through the Corporation Tax Return (CT600).
  5. Reclaiming the Tax:
    The tax paid on s455 Directors Loan can be reclaimed by the company after the loan has been repaid. LC Forms (hmrc.gov.uk)
  6. Benefit in Kind on Directors Loan:
    If the loan exceeds Β£10,000, the company may need to report it as a “benefit in kind” for the director. This means that the individual may be subject to personal income tax on the value of the loan unless the Director/Shareholder pays interest on the loan at least at the approved HMRC rate.
  7. Board Resolution for Loans over Β£10,000:
    To avoid the potential income tax implications of benefit in kind, a board resolution should be implemented authorising the director’s loan. This should be done before the loan is taken or within nine months of the company’s year end. A loan agreement is also recommended.
  8. Bed and Breakfasting Loans:
    To prevent circumventing the 9-month rule, bed and breakfasting occurs when the director repays the loan just before the end of the 9-month period and immediately takes out a new loan. Anti-avoidance rules are in place to discourage this practice. The key rules are the ’30 day rule’ and ‘intentions and arrangements rule’.
  9. Anti-Avoidance Rules:
    HMRC has anti-avoidance rules in place to prevent the abuse of s455 Directors Loan transactions. It is essential to ensure that all loans between directors/shareholders and their companies are conducted fairly and genuinely.
  10. Relief Time Period – 9 Months:
    The relief time period refers to the nine months following the end of a company’s accounting period. If the loan is repaid within this period, the tax paid on s455 Directors Loan can be reclaimed.
  11. Including Notes in Micro Accounts:
    Micro entities are required to prepare and submit detailed notes as part of their financial statements. It is important to include relevant notes regarding any outstanding s455 Directors Loan, as this will provide transparency during the tax assessment process.

Conclusion:
Understanding the tax consequences of s455 Directors Loan is crucial for UK business owners. By addressing the tax liabilities promptly, ensuring compliance with regulations, and seeking professional advice, companies can navigate this complex area of taxation efficiently. Stay informed, keep accurate records, and stay on top of your financial obligations to avoid any unnecessary penalties or additional tax liabilities.

steve@bicknells.net

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