Can a Property Flipper or Developer use Entrepreneurs Relief? Reply

City Developer

Property Flipping and Development are Trades (not investments), so YES, they could qualify for Entrepreneurs Relief.

You may be able to pay less Capital Gains Tax when you sell (or ‘dispose of’) all or part of your business.

Entrepreneurs’ Relief means you’ll pay tax at 10% on all gains on qualifying assets.

Work out if you qualify

You’ll qualify if you dispose of any of the following:

  • all or part of your business as a sole trader or business partner – including the business’s assets after it closed
  • shares or securities in a company where you have at least 5% of shares and voting rights (known as a ‘personal company’)

https://www.gov.uk/entrepreneurs-relief/eligibility

https://stevejbicknell.com/2013/11/24/5-pitfalls-to-avoid-with-entrepreneurs-tax-relief/

How does Entrepreneurs Relief help?

Let’s take an example using a Company

Flipping or Development Profit £100,000

Corporation 20% £20,000

Profit after Tax £80,000

If close the business and you apply Entrepreneurs Relief the you will pay 10% tax = £8,000

You will also get your CGT allowance of £11k deducted first.

Without Entrepreneurs Relief the tax would 20% or even more if the distribution was via dividends or salary. For unincorporated businesses the tax could be 20%, 40% or 45%!

What are the rules for ending a business?

  • The business has ceased.
  • The assets were in use at the time of cessation.
  • The business was owned for 1 year by the individual prior to cessation.
  • The assets were disposed of within 3 years of cessation.
  • The assets are not held as investments.

However, if you do the same thing within 2 years HMRC may consider that you are only doing this to gain a tax advantage and it could then be treated as income.

steve@bicknells.net

 

When do you pay Capital Gains Tax on a Property Sale? 1

One family house for sale

Capital Gains Tax is a tax on the profit when you sell (or ‘dispose of’) something (an ‘asset’) that’s increased in value.

It’s the gain you make that’s taxed, not the amount of money you receive.

So it doesn’t apply to Property Developers, their profits are trading income not investment income.

Disposing of an asset includes:

If you sell a property that your have lived in you will probably qualify for Principle Private Residence Relief

https://stevejbicknell.com/2015/04/13/how-does-principle-private-residence-relief-work/

Even it it wasn’t your Principle Private Residence but you did own it personally you will still get an allowance of £11,100 tax free.

Companies get an indexation allowance

https://stevejbicknell.com/2012/06/17/capital-gains-tax-for-companies/

Residential properties don’t qualify for business asset rollover relief.

Once you have worked out your gain, the choices for individuals are:

Report your gain and pay straight away

You can use the Report Capital Gains Tax online service for the 2016 to 2017 tax year (6 April 2016 to 5 April 2017) if you’re a UK resident.

You’ll need a Government Gateway account – you can set one up from the sign-in page.

You don’t need to wait for the end of the tax year – you can use this service as soon as you’ve calculated your gains and the tax you owe.

Report in a Self Assessment tax return

Use Self Assessment to report your gain in the tax year after you disposed of assets.

If you don’t usually send a tax return, register for Self Assessment by 5 October following the tax year you disposed of your chargeable assets.

If you’re already registered but haven’t received a letter reminding you to fill in a return, contact HMRC by 5 October.

You must send your return by 31 January (31 October if you send paper forms).

Report Company Capital Gains in a Corporation Tax Return

Report your gains to HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) when you file your Company Tax Return. How much tax you pay depends on any allowances and reliefs you claim.

steve@bicknells.net

Are property transfers between spouses taxed? 1

Mosaïque de logements

When you think about property and property investments the first tax that comes to mind is Capital Gains Tax (CGT).

You don’t pay Capital Gains Tax on assets you give or sell to your husband, wife or civil partner, unless:

The tax year is from 6 April to 5 April the following year.

https://www.gov.uk/capital-gains-tax/gifts

However, if your property has a mortgage transfering it could create a Stamp Duty Charge (SDLT).

You might pay SDLT when you transfer a share in a property to a husband, wife or partner when you do one of the following:

  • marry
  • enter into a civil partnership
  • move in together

You pay SDLT if the consideration given in exchange for the share transfer is more than the current SDLT threshold for the property type.

Example 1 – you don’t pay SDLT

A house has a value of £180,000. The owner of the property has equity of £90,000 and an outstanding mortgage of £90,000. The owner transfers a half share of the property to their partner.

Their partner:

  • pays cash for half of the equity – £45,000
  • takes responsibility for 50% of the outstanding mortgage – £45,000

So the consideration for SDLT is £90,000, made up of the:

  • cash payment
  • 50% share of the outstanding mortgage

£90,000 is below the current SDLT threshold so there’s no tax to pay. You must still tell HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) about the transaction on an SDLT return.

Example 2 – you pay SDLT even though no money changes hands

The owner of a property valued at £500,000 with an outstanding mortgage of £400,000 transfers half the property to their partner when they marry. Their partner takes on 50% of the mortgage (£200,000).

HMRC charge SDLT on the amount paid for a property or the amount of ‘consideration’ given.

By taking liability for the mortgage, the owner’s partner has given ‘consideration’ of £200,000 for their share of the property which is £1,500 SDLT (0% of £125,000 + 2% of £75,000).

They must pay SDLT on that amount and tell HMRC about the transfer by filling in an SDLT return.

The equity isn’t included in the calculation as you only pay SDLT on the consideration given.

If the transfer is a gift

If the transfer is a gift and there’s no consideration, SDLT doesn’t normally apply.

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/sdlt-transferring-ownership-of-land-or-property

steve@bicknells.net

Soon you could pay income tax on selling a Buy to Let! Reply

act now icon

If you thought paying Capital Gains at higher rates was bad enough wait till you have to pay income tax rates on the gains!

As reported by Property 118 on 25th August 2016

The government have slipped some additional clauses into the finance bill 2016 “Sections 75-78: taxation of profits from trading and investing in UK Land” which make profits made on the sale of buy-to-let property become taxable income, at income tax rates.

They have started a campaign to try to stop the change https://www.property118.com/capital-gains-on-btl-to-be-taxed-as-income/89928/

Its another rule that won’t apply to companies.

https://stevejbicknell.com/2015/08/24/5-reasons-why-you-need-a-property-investment-company/

Factsheet

Click Here to Download the Factsheet

 

steve@bicknells.net

Will TAAR cause you problems on company distributions? (New Share Rules) Reply

Successful Businessman With A Contract In Hand

HMRC are currently consulting on new rules to start in April 2016.

The consultation is focusing on Capital Gains Tax (CGT) ways to extract money from companies to create Target Anti Avoidance Rules (TAAR) covering:

  1. A disposal of shares to a third party
  2. A distribution made in a winding up
  3. A repayment of Share Capital including Share Premium
  4. A valid purchase of own shares in an unquoted company

Here are the examples of ‘problems’ HMRC want to resolve, Example 1 is ‘moneyboxing’ and/or ‘phoenixism’ and sometimes involves ‘special purpose vehicles’

Example 1

Example 2 involves creating a holding company…

Example 2

The consultation ends on the 3rd February 2016, the results are likely to be controversial!

steve@bicknells.net

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No Rollover for Buy to Lets 1

4880157508_dd2f144a45_m

Its a common mis-understanding that many Buy to Let investors think that they can rollover the gains under business asset rollover reliefs.

Residential Property Investment is not a trading activity, whenever you sell a property that isn’t your main residence you will be liable to capital gains tax.

If you want to release cash from your property portfolio its better to consider other options such as re-financing to take advantage of capital growth.

Also joint ownership (particularly between spouses) will increase the available Capital Gains Allowance you have, individuals currently have £11,000 per year. This allowance might cover your gain?

steve@bicknells.net

Overseas property investors – are you ready for CGT in 2015 Reply

Taxes

In the Autumn Statement 2013 it was announced that a CGT charge will be introduced from April 2015 on ‘future’ capital gains made by non-UK residents disposing of UK residential property. George Osborne said…

“Britain is an open country that welcomes investment from all over the world, including investment in our residential property”

“But it’s not right that those who live in this country pay capital gains tax when they sell a home that is not their primary residence – while those who don’t live here do not. That is unfair.”

UK Residents typically pay capital gains tax at 28% on any profit from selling property that is not considered their primary residence.

 

 Reuters reported in Dec 2013…

Property lawyers and estate agents said foreign owners would be relieved the tax will not apply to historic gains before 2015. But they cautioned that the overall impact could be marginal as many foreign investors see London property as a safe and profitable place to park capital.

“Tax is not the primary driver for the majority of international buyers of residential property in London,” Knight Frank’s head of global research, Liam Bailey, said.

“It is important to note that the change to CGT rules brings the UK in line with other key investor markets, such as New York and Paris, where equivalent taxes can approach 35-50 percent depending on the owner’s residency status.”

It was not immediately clear how the tax would be collected and how it would apply if foreign owners used a domestic company to purchase property.

When a company disposes of an asset and makes a capital gain, as the main rate of corporation tax in 2014 is 21% (20% small profits rate) there could be a future tax saving opportunity for overseas investors to transfer property to limited companies.

There are other tax implications for example ATED (Annual Tax on Enveloped Dwellings) and SDLT (Stamp Duty Land Tax) but now could be a good time to consider your options.

steve@bicknells.net

Capital Gains Tax for Companies 1

Capital Gains can occur in many circumstances, for example, when the company:

  • sells, gives away, exchanges or otherwise disposes of (cease to own) an asset or part of an asset
  • receives money from an asset – for example compensation for a damaged asset

Sometimes it can be hard to establish the value of the gain and HMRC can carry out a post valuation check which is requested using http://www.hmrc.gov.uk/forms/cg34.pdf

Example – calculating the chargeable gain on the sale of a shop
Calculation step Result
Step 1: amount received for the asset in May 2011 £200,000
Step 2: deduct £120,000 (the cost of the asset in November 1997) £200,000 − £120,000 = £80,000
Step 3: deduct expenses on improving the asset (£10,000 spent on building an extension in June 2006) £80,000 − £10,000 = £70,000
Find the inflation factor for November 1997 0.474
Calculate the Indexation Allowance £120,000 × 0.474 = £56,880
Deduct the Indexation Allowance £70,000 − £56,880 = £13,120
Step 4: look up the appropriate inflation factor and calculate the Indexation Allowance for the extension 0.185
£10,000 × 0.185 = £1,850
Deduct the Indexation Allowance for the extension to arrive at the chargeable gain £13,120 − £1,850 = £11,270

http://www.hmrc.gov.uk/ct/managing/company-tax-return/returns/chargeable-gain.htm

You can get a full list of indexation allowances at http://www.hmrc.gov.uk/rates/cg-indexation-allowance/apr12-ct-cgains.pdf

If the losses don’t exceed the gains, put the total gains in Box 16 on your Company Tax Return and the total losses, if any, in Box 17. Deduct Box 17 from Box 16 and put the result in Box 18 – this is your ‘net chargeable gain’.

If the losses do exceed the gains, leave Box 16, Box 17 and Box 18 blank but put the amount of the net loss in Box 131. You can then ‘carry forward’ those capital losses to offset against any capital gains you make in a future Corporation Tax accounting period(s). You would include those losses in Box 17 of a future Company Tax Return. You can carry forward capital losses indefinitely.

If you intend to replace the asset you may be able to apply Business Asset Rollover Relief, this is most commonly use for Land and Buildings.

steve@bicknells.net