Have you been over taxed on your pension withdrawal? Reply

This is exactly how I pictured the partners lounge

You should be able to withdraw 25% of your pension tax free, but your pension provider will tax you on payments above this level.

If they don’t hold a current P45, the pension provider will apply an emergency tax code on a month 1/week 1 basis, which could mean you pay too much tax.

You will need these forms to reclaim the tax

Form P50Z – if the client has chosen to empty all their pension pot in one go and they have no other PAYE or pension income (other than the state pension);

Form P53Z – if the client has chosen to empty all their pension pot in one go and they do have other PAYE or pension income other than the state pension;

Form P55 – where the client has taken a lump sum payment which doesn’t use up all of their pension pot, they have only taken a single payment and don’t intend to take further payments in that tax year.

steve@bicknells.net

How to use the new UK pension rules to make £500…. Reply

CASH ICON

Here is the theory….

  1. You pay £8,000 into a defined contribution pension fund
  2. Its topped up by £2,000 (tax back from the government)
  3. So that’s £10,000 in your pension pot
  4. You take out £2,500 (25%) tax free
  5. You then pay 20% tax on £7,500 = £1,500
  6. So £8,000 in + £2,000 credit – £1,500 tax = £8,500 which is £500 more than you paid in

This is based on the HMRC rules.

You must be at least 60 years of age to take your pension pot as a lump sum.

You may qualify to take all of your pension pot as a lump sum if:

  • one of your pension pots is worth £10,000 or less

If a lump sum is paid instead of a small pension before you started to get that pension, only 75 per cent of the lump sum is taxable.

There will be some charges from your pension provider but these should be small, take look at this list for a comparison

ABI data suggest that 25% of pension pots are less than £10,000

steve@bicknells.net