Are you letting property – watch out for your Schedule 23 notice! Reply

Schedule 23 Notices are being sent out by HMRC to all Lettings Agents.

If you’ve received a notice under schedule 23 of the Finance Act 2011, you are legally obliged to make a return to HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) of the information specified in the notice by the date given in the notice.

To comply with the notice agents must provide a spreadsheet including

Landlord’s name

This must include the full name of the recipient of the landord.

Address

When showing addresses use the 5 fields provided, showing each part of the address in a separate field (see below regarding postcodes). For example:

Address 1 Address 2 Address 3 Address 4 Address 5
Hillcrest Cottage Mountain View Watchgate Kendal Cumbria
2 Speyside Avenue Hillington Basingstoke Hants

Start in the ‘Address 1’ field and leave any unused fields blank. Don’t use commas in any part of the address.

Postcode

Enter the postcode only in the dedicated column provided.

Gross amount paid

Show the amount of the total gross rent received from the tenant for the landlord for the period shown in this notice.

Don’t include commas or minus amounts.

Please show amount in pounds and pence without any currency symbol, for example 2105.32.

Currency codes

Enter a code for each amount to identify the appropriate currency. These currency codes are recognised internationally, commonly used currency codes are:

  • UK sterling – GBP
  • euro – EUR
  • United States dollar – USD
  • Canadian dollar – CAD
  • Australian dollar – AUD

Full list of currency codes

If the currency code column in your return is blank HMRC will assume that the amounts are in UK sterling.

Letting address

Please enter the full address of the property or land managed on behalf your client.

Postcode

Please enter full postcode of the let property/land separately from the address.

Tax year

This the tax year of the return. Please use ‘yyyy/yyyy’ format for example 2015/2016.

Your company/organisation’s name

This is your organisation’s name.

Source reference

If available, please insert a reference number from your accounting system to identify the record (in case we need to contact you).

SteveJBicknell Blog gets 450,000 hits with over 9,000 followers Reply

Yes, its true, our blog has been read over 450,000 times, keep reading and help us to reach the half a million mark.

We now have over 9,000 followers and we have made 804 post.

Google has become our best friend and is the source of around 94% of our visitors.

That’s pretty impressive for a blog about accounting and tax!

What’s more, we don’t pay to boost posts or use any other ways to gain advantage, we just post content that our followers and readers value.

Our blog was started to help business owners resolve common issues, its purpose is to help people and to explain how tax works and where the problem areas are. Its designed to give complete answers, rather than ‘here’s a problem, now contact us for the answer’ . We want readers to be able to resolve basic and common problems themselves for free and if their problems are more complex or they need extra help then to contact us or their own accountant.

We don’t ask subscribers and followers to pay and we don’t sell advertising.

So why do we bother?

  1. We really do want to help people, why should tax and accounting be a black art, lets help everyone to understand it
  2. By helping you, we also increase our own knowledge and understanding – so we all learn together
  3. The 804 posts are a huge resource for anyone seeking the solution to a problem
  4. Our blogs are a great reference source as we generally have links to the specific HMRC rules and helpsheets, we often quote our blogs when our clients ask about an issue they face
  5. We enjoy writing them

What lessons have we learned from blogging?

  • Always have a picture
  • Choose a good title for the URL
  • Post regularly

Did you know…

  • There are more than 1.5 billion blogs
  • The majority of blog readers are aged 18 to 36
  • Most people read more than 5 blogs per day
  • Most bloggers share their blogs on social media

steve@bicknells.net

 

How should you account for a Property Management Company? 1

Property Management companies, for instance – Letting Agents, manage properties that they don’t own.

Their services are VATable if they voluntarily register or hit the VAT threshold.

Their income should be the fees that they charge to their clients and they can offset the expenses that relate to their business for example:

Office costs

Accountancy

Insurance

Motor Expenses

But as the properties aren’t owned by them they need to keep their client accounts on the balance sheet in control accounts.

Typically

Rent from Tenants

Maintenance Costs

Management Fees

Then the net amount is passed to the landlord with a statement

It is also possible that the Property Management Company may keep their client accounts entirely separate to their own with separate bank accounts and ledgers, this approach is the best option

Sage One makes this easy to account for properties because you can use Projects, Cost Codes and Departments to analyse the costs.

There are also lots of specialist software package for property management companies

steve@bicknells.net

Are you making the most of your tax free allowances? 1

Each year we a get tax free allowances:

NI Free £8,164

Tax Free Salary £11,500

Capital Gains Tax Allowance £11,300

Rent a Room £7,500

Dividend Allowance £5,000

Personal Savings Allowance £1,000

Then there are  many other tax saving opportunities like tax free childcare https://stevejbicknell.com/2016/08/19/childcare-3-part-report-for-childcare-providers-and-parents/

Plus tax free benefits https://stevejbicknell.com/2016/09/21/are-you-making-the-most-of-tax-free-benefits/

Have you tried to use these allowances?

What if you set out each year to take advantage of these tax free opportunities?

You would need your own business to be able to restrict your earnings to £8,164 or £11,500 as National Minimum Wage would mean you will get pay levels above these £7.50 x 37.5 hours x 52 weeks = £14,625, however, directors can pay themselves below NMW.

To use the Capital Gains Allowance you are going to need to have assets to sell and make a gain

Rent a Room is achievable especially if you take in students

Dividend Allowance is great if you have your own company

Everyone should be able to use the PSA

Why not sit down and work out how you could maximise the use of the tax free allowances that are available

steve@bicknells.net

 

 

 

 

 

Do Directors really have to do self assessment returns? read What happened to a Property Company Director Reply

The official guidance for Directors is…

As a director of a limited company, you must:

You don’t need to register for Self Assessment or send a tax return if your company is a non-profit organisation (for example, a charity) and you didn’t get any pay or benefits, like a company car.

https://www.gov.uk/running-a-limited-company

https://www.gov.uk/self-assessment-tax-returns/who-must-send-a-tax-return

So, basically, if you are a director you must register!

Many accountants think that this one size fits all approach is a little over the top and returns for salaried directors are unnecessary in some cases but the rules are absolutely clear, Directors must register!

So the latest case involving a property company came as a surprise to many accountants

http://financeandtax.decisions.tribunals.gov.uk/judgmentfiles/j9898/TC05929.pdf

Mohammed Salem Kadhem (case TC05929) became a director of a property company on 21 May 2014. He received no pay or dividends from that company and didn’t register for self-assessment.

It was reported in full at http://www.accountingweb.co.uk/tax/hmrc-policy/tribunal-company-directors-dont-have-to-submit-tax-returns?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=AWUKPOW210617&utm_content=AWUKPOW210617+CID_b1f3f98189c6021fa5eaf5a489ca5e3d&utm_source=internal_cm&utm_term=Company%20directors%20dont%20have%20to%20submit%20tax%20returns

Basically HMRC made mistakes in their approach to the case basically arguing that a notice to file had been sent but were unable to prove the notice was sent and Mohammed Salem Kadhem won.

The tribunal accepted that he had a reasonable excuse for filing a late return and all the penalties were quashed.

This doesn’t change the fact that all directors must register and a file self assessment returns. Don’t risk it, its better to file returns!

steve@bicknells.net

The Second Income Campaign re-visited! what is your side hustle? Reply

Second Jobs or as the Americans call them Side Hustles are very popular, here is a website focused on them

http://www.sidehustlenation.com/ideas/

Almost a third of British workers run some kind of creative business outside their main job contributing an estimated £15bn to the UK economy, according to research from Moo.com. One in ten part-time creative entrepreneurs plans to leave their job to focus on their business full-time within the next year. However, 60% said it was their passion for the business, and not making money, that motivated them. The most popular part-time creative ventures are in food and cooking, gardening, photography and knitting. (According to Law Donut)

So why are micro businesses taking off:

  1. You can start off working at home
  2. Your start up costs are low
  3. You can do it part time when it suits you
  4. With wages frozen and costs rising it can provide a useful additional income
  5. Its easy to be price competitive with low overheads
  6. The Internet makes it easy to sell your goods and services
  7. Your social capital can be used to generate sales ie use your contacts and connections
  8. There could be tax advantages – employees generally pay more tax than sole traders
  9. Some clients prefer the personal touch
  10. It could be start of something big

HMRC orginally launched their campaign in April 2014 and have updated it on 12th June 2017.

The Second Incomes Campaign is an opportunity open to individuals in employment who have an additional untaxed source of income.

Examples could include:

  • fees from consultancy or other services such as public speaking or providing training
  • payment for organising parties and events or providing entertainment
  • income from activities such as taxi driving, hairdressing, providing fitness training or landscape gardening
  • profits from spare time activities such as making and selling craft items
  • profits from buying and selling goods, for example regular market stalls, boot sales etc

 

The criteria used to assess if an activity is a hobby or a business are:

  • The size and commerciality of the activity.
  • The frequency of the activity and transactions
  • The application of business principles.
  • Whether there is a genuine profit motive.
  • The amount of time devoted to the activities.
  • The existence of arm’s-length customers (as opposed to just selling your wares to family and friends).

To take part in the Second Incomes Campaign you should:

  • tell HMRC that you want to take part in the Second Incomes Campaign (Notify)
  • tell HMRC about all income, gains, tax and duties you’ve not previously told them about (Disclose)
  • make a formal offer
  • pay what you owe
  • help HMRC as much as you can if they ask you for more information

To benefit from the reduced penalties offered HMRC will take account of the level to which you have helped them and the accuracy of the information you provided.

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/second-incomes-campaign-your-guide-to-making-a-disclosure/second-incomes-campaign-your-guide-to-making-a-disclosure

steve@bicknells.net

How does BCTC work with Local Businesses and the Council? Reply

Bournemouth Chamber of Trade & Commerce

View original post 90 more words

Do you have overseas assets and income you haven’t declared? Reply

All accountants and tax agents should now be sending or have sent a letter or e mail to their clients saying

From 2016, HM Revenue & Customs (HMRC) is getting an unprecedented amount of information about people’s overseas accounts, structures, trusts, and investments from more than 100 jurisdictions worldwide, thanks to agreements to increase global tax transparency. This gives HMRC unprecedented levels of information to check that, as in most cases, the right tax has been paid.

If you have already declared all of your past and present income or gains to HMRC, including from overseas, you do not need to worry. But if you are in any doubt, HMRC recommends that you read the factsheet attached to help you decide now what to do next.

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/client-notification-income-or-assets-abroad/notes-on-how-and-when-to-send-the-client-notification-letter

Here is a link to the fact sheet

https://bbaltd.sharepoint.com/_layouts/15/guestaccess.aspx?docid=0b2969c05c0b74833bb2c42df251ddfb0&authkey=AQoJsi8KFnP87sNNjN-JK4E

Time is running out, so make sure you declare all your income and assets.

steve@bicknells.net

What if you fail to register for CIS Reply

The Construction Industry Scheme (CIS) applies to anyone who carries out construction work as a trade, in other words developers, contractors, building maintenance and repairs, decorating, property conversion, basically if you use sub-contractors to work on a building its probably within CIS. It does, however, exclude property investors (although this could change soon) and domestic householders.

Tax Aid have a good example of how it works

Rob is asked to undertake some repair work on Ben’s private house. He asks Wendy to help him with the electrical work. Wendy is working on a self-employed basis for this contract. Ben pays Rob without deduction of tax as Ben is a private householder. Rob then pays Wendy.

Rob should register under CIS as a contractor before making the payment to Wendy. Rob should ask Wendy for her UTR and check her CIS status with HMRC. He should then pay Wendy net of 20% tax or net of 30% tax depending on her status with HMRC (exceptionally, if Wendy is entitled to register with HMRC for gross payment, then HMRC would tell Rob that he can pay Wendy without deduction of tax; gross payment will only apply to larger businesses).

If HMRC advises Rob that Wendy is registered under CIS (but not for gross payment), then Rob will keep back 20% tax and pay this CIS tax across to HMRC on Wendy’s behalf.

If Rob failed to register as a contractor under the CIS scheme he could face very big penalties. These include a £3,000 fine for not keeping CIS records, and a £100 per month penalty per missed return (and returns are due monthly).

Failing to register for a number of years could lead to penalties in the tens of thousands of pounds. This can happen even when all the workers are registered as self-employed and have paid the tax due on their income.

In summary the penalties are:

The maximum penalty is currently £3,000 for failing to register then there are late filing penalties

How late the return is Penalty
1 day late £100
2 months late £200
6 months late £300 or 5% of the CIS deductions on the return, whichever is higher
12 months late £300 or 5% of the CIS deductions on the return, whichever is higher

For returns later than this, you may be given an additional penalty of up to £3,000 or 100% of the CIS deductions on the return, whichever is higher.

There is no lower limit for CIS registration and the penalties can be harsh as demonstrated in the cases below

Brian Parkinson a gardner and lanscaper who used occasional subcontractors and got £31,500 in CIS Penalties!

The FTT heard evidence that little or no loss of tax resulted from this omission, as the amount of tax Parkinson ought to have deducted under the CIS was put at £837.90. [Brian Parkinson and the Commissioners for Her Majesty’s Revenue & Customs TC04526; Appeal number: TC/2013/00224].
This comprised £6,000 (5 x the £1,200 maximum) charged under the Taxes Management Act 1970 (TMA 1970), s98A(2)(a) and also month 13 penalties of £25,500 charged under TMA 1970, s. 98A(2)(b). – See more at: https://www.accountancylive.com/partial-win-gardener-over-%E2%80%98excessive%E2%80%99-cis-penalties#sthash.zJA59Gjv.AfCNNGRJ.dpuf
Or how about CJS Eastern an installer of lightning conductors

INCOME TAX – subcontractors – appellant company contracted with a third party provider to supply “operatives” – third party provider “net” for CIS purposes – company’s failure to make CIS returns  – fixed monthly penalties of £28,500 – Month 13 penalties of £56,500 – whether reasonable excuse – held, no – whether disproportionate as a breach of A1P1 – Tribunal’s jurisdiction and interaction with mitigation –  Bosher followed – fixed penalties upheld – Month 13 penalties set aside as excessive – appeal allowed in part

https://cases.legal/lang-en/act-uk2-156151.html

If you work in construction make sure you register and comply with CIS!

steve@bicknells.net

How do you complete a Monthly CIS Return? 1

Under the Construction Industry Scheme (CIS), contractors deduct money from a subcontractor’s payments and pass it to HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC).

The deductions count as advance payments towards the subcontractor’s tax and National Insurance.

Contractors must register for the scheme. Subcontractors don’t have to register, but deductions are taken from their payments at a higher rate if they’re not registered.

Every month contractors have to file a CIS return online and issue Deduction Statements to Subcontractors.

But many people are confused as to what to put in the boxes on the return, below is the official guidance.

Deductions at the standard rate

Examples D1 to D3 show deductions at the standard rate of 20% which was the rate in force at the time of writing this guide.

Example D1

Where no materials are supplied (‘labour-only’)
A labour-only subcontractor does work on site for £200
Total payment £200
Amount deducted at 20% = £40
Net payment to subcontractor £160

The contractor calculates the deduction (£40), which has to be paid to our accounts office. The labour-only subcontractor receives the balance of £160.

Entries on the contractor’s monthly return

In example D1, the contractor should enter the following amounts in the appropriate boxes on the contractor’s monthly return:

Total payment £200
Direct cost of materials used £0
Amount deducted £40

Example D2

The following is an example of a calculation where materials as well as labour are supplied (‘supply and fix’) and the contractor has paid the subcontractor’s expenses.

Where the subcontractor isn’t registered for VAT, any VAT they had to pay on materials should be included in the cost of materials when calculating the CIS deduction.

Where expenses, for example accommodation, mobile phone and fuel costs are paid to the subcontractor, the amounts should be included in the subcontractor’s gross payment.

A tiling subcontractor, who isn’t VAT-registered, agrees to tile a wall and to supply the necessary materials for a total payment of £535. The materials cost the subcontractor a total of £235 (£200 + £35 for VAT). The subcontractor is also paid accommodation costs of £50 and fuel of £10.

Labour charge £300
Materials £235
Accommodation and fuel £60
Amount due (invoice amount) £595

Calculation of deduction

Total payment £595
Less cost of materials (inclusive of VAT) £235
Amount liable to deduction £360
Amount deducted at 20% £72
Net payment to subcontractor £523

The contractor deducts the cost of materials from the price for the whole job and calculates the deduction on the difference of £360. The contractor has to pay £72 to our accounts office and pays £523 (£595 – £72) to the subcontractor.

Entries on the contractor’s monthly return

In example D2, the contractor should enter the following amounts in the appropriate boxes on the contractor’s monthly return:

Total payment £595
Direct cost of materials used £235
Amount deducted £72

Example D3

The following is an example of a calculation where materials as well as labour are supplied (‘supply and fix’). Where the subcontractor is registered for VAT, any VAT they had to pay on materials should be excluded from the cost of materials when calculating the CIS deduction.

For the total cost of £600, a subcontractor who is a taxable person for VAT purposes, agrees to paint the interior of a building and to supply the materials. The painter pays £235 for the materials, which includes VAT of £35.

Labour charge £400
Materials £200
Total payment £600
Add VAT £105
Amount due (invoice amount) £705

Calculation of deduction

Total payment (exclusive of VAT) £600
Less cost of materials (exclusive of VAT) £200
Amount liable to deduction £400
Amount deducted at 20% £80
Net payment to subcontractor £625

The subcontractor is paid £625, which is the invoice amount (£705) less the deduction (£80).

Entries on the contractor’s monthly return

In example D3, the contractor should enter the following amounts in the appropriate boxes on the contractor’s monthly return:

Total payment £600
Direct cost of materials used £200
Amount deducted £80

Deductions at the higher rate

Examples D4 to D6 show deductions at the higher rate of 30%. This rate is used for illustration purposes and may or may not be the rate in force at the time of reading this guide.

Example D4

Where no materials are supplied (‘labour-only’)
A labour-only subcontractor does work on site for £200
Total payment £200
Amount deducted at 30% £60
Net payment to subcontractor £140

The contractor calculates the deduction (£60), which has to be paid to our accounts office. The labour-only subcontractor receives the balance of £140.

Entries on the contractor’s monthly return

In example D4, the contractor should enter the following amounts in the appropriate boxes on the contractor’s monthly return:

Total payment £200
Direct cost of materials used £0
Amount deducted £60

Example D5

The following is an example of a calculation where materials as well as labour are supplied (‘supply and fix’). Where the subcontractor isn’t registered for VAT, any VAT they had to pay on materials should be included in the cost of materials when calculating the CIS deduction.

A tiling subcontractor, who isn’t VAT registered, agrees to tile a wall and to supply the necessary materials for a total payment of £535. The materials cost the subcontractor a total of £235 (£200 + £35 for VAT).

Labour charge £300
Materials £235
Amount due (invoice amount) £535

Calculation of deduction

Total payment £535
Less cost of materials (inclusive of VAT) £235
Amount liable to deduction £300
Amount deducted at 30% £90
Net payment to subcontractor £445

The contractor deducts the cost of materials from the price for the whole job and calculates the deduction on the difference of £300. The contractor has to pay £90 to our accounts office and pays £445 (£535 – £90) to the subcontractor.

Entries on the contractor’s monthly return

In example D5, the contractor should enter the following amounts in the appropriate boxes on the contractor’s monthly return:

Total payment £535
Direct cost of materials used £235
Amount deducted £90

Example D6

The following is an example of a calculation where materials as well as labour are supplied (‘supply and fix’). Where the subcontractor is registered for VAT, any VAT they had to pay on materials should be excluded in the cost of materials when calculating the CIS deduction.

For the total cost of £600 a subcontractor, who is a taxable person for VAT purposes, agrees to paint the interior of a building and to supply the materials. The painter pays £235 for the materials, which includes VAT of £35.

Labour charge £400
Materials £200
Total payment £600
Add VAT £105
Amount due (invoice amount) £705

Calculation of deduction

Total payment (exclusive of VAT) £600
Less cost of materials (exclusive of VAT) £200
Amount liable to deduction £400
Amount deducted at 30% £120
Net payment to subcontractor £585

The subcontractor is paid £585, which is the invoice amount (£705) less the deduction (£120).

Entries on the contractor’s monthly return

In example D6, the contractor should enter the following amounts in the appropriate boxes on the contractor’s monthly return:

Total payment £600
Direct cost of materials used £200
Amount deducted £120

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/construction-industry-scheme-cis-340/construction-industry-scheme-a-guide-for-contractors-and-subcontractors-cis-340#appd

steve@bicknells.net